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CALVIN SCHNEIDER, ORANGE COUNTY BICYCLE ACCIDENT ATTORNEY.


Choosing to commute using bicycles instead of vehicles has gained much popularity over the years. Not only does this allow the commuter to save money on gas and vehicle upkeep and maintenance, but it is also great for the environment! Unfortunately though, cyclists do face many dangers while traveling on the road. Uneducated or distracted drivers pose a huge risk to cyclists, who have much less protection and safety features and are thus much more likely to sustain injuries on the road.

BICYCLE INJURY STATISTICS IN CALIFORNIA

Bicycle accidents are all too common, The state of California alone leads the nation with cyclists accidents resulting in deaths in the year of 2014.

Consider these statistics:

  • California leads the nation in cyclist deaths, with 338 collision deaths from 2010-2012.
  • During that same period, California’s cyclist fatalities rose from 23 to 123
  • California had the most cyclists killed of any state in 2012.
  • Cyclist traffic deaths increased 16 percent during the study period.
  • More than 2,000 cyclists were killed nationwide during the study period.
  • Bicyclist deaths account for twice as many motor vehicle deaths in California than the national average – 4 percent versus 2 percent
  • Just six states accounted for more than 50 percent of all cycling fatalities studied. They were California, Florida, Illinois, New York, Michigan and Texas.
  • 84 percent of fatalities were adults aged 20 or older. And 74 percent of fatalities were adult males
  • Failure to wear a helmet was an extraordinarily significant contributor to death: The majority of cyclists fatally injured in 2012 were not wearing a helmet.

 

"Three Feet for Safety Act" - Learn About the California Buffer Law

California's "Three Feet for Safety Act" Following the lead of many other states, California passed a law in 2014 (California Vehicle Code section 21760) which requires that drivers maintain a minimum 3-foot buffer when passing a bicyclist.